Archive for February, 2017


Steve AokiImage copyright
Ethan Miller

Image caption

Steve Aoki says he is inspired by the protests against the political changes in America

Next time you feel like a bit of a moan about how few holidays you get, spare a thought for DJ and producer Steve Aoki who plays 300 plus shows a year and takes less than an average working week off.

Okay, we understand the idea of travelling the globe and playing music to thousands of gibbering clubbers may not seem like work to most punters but the income tax man would beg to differ.

Anyway, we tracked Steve down on his uber-short vacation ahead of the Grammys where a Netflix film about his hectic lifestyle called I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead was nominated in the documentary category.

Steve also recently collaborated with One Directioner Louis Tomlinson on the track Just Hold On.

Steve, we’re speaking to you in Aspen, Colorado, how is it going?

It’s beautiful, I have a view of the mountains and the trees, it’s really nice.

Are you a country person at heart then or are you a city boy?

I’m a city boy that romanticises being away from the city.

300 shows a year and just four days off, is that all it takes to recharge the batteries?

I’ve got to take a break sometime, so I’m spending the days snowboarding and enjoying myself with my friends, I do that once a year and this is my four days off. I try to enjoy doing my hobbies. You get into a cycle and it becomes awkward when I’m not in the studio or touring and playing shows, I get fidgety, I have to get back into the grind. I’m lucky because I love what I do.

Image copyright
Vivien Killilea

Image caption

Steve collaborated with Louis Tomlinson in 2016

Where are you at your most creative?

That’s an interesting thing because before, I would have to find it in a a particular location but I’ve realised that my inspiration is everywhere I go and I need to be able to harness that and sometimes those moments of creativity are fleeting and you have to try and capture it when it comes. Luckily I get to travel the world and meet amazing creative people and you just have to be in the now and soak it in.

You spend most of the year travelling, what are your must-have travel items?

Just so I can survive, because I don’t have a regular sleep pattern, in order to sleep in a car or a plane, I have my eye-mask, my specific eye-mask, I have this obnoxious pillow I travel with and my headphones.

The most important bit about the eye mask is that it doesn’t touch my eyes so it looks like a bra for a doll, it’s bulging, I should paint some eyeballs on it. I put it on and it’s blacked out. I got my hood up, headphones on, if I’m travelling through Japan or China, I have a face-mask, you can’t tell who I am.

You’re working with the Migos, who were described by Donald Glover as ‘this generation’s Beatles’, what did he mean and do you agree?

I’ve know these guys for a long time, they played a show in Atlanta, we went into the studio and knocked out a song real quick. These guys are amazing, without writing anything down they get an idea and start vibing it out and just nail it in one go.

The thing about music is that you look at The Beatles and throughout history there are very few groups that define a sound and generation. That song Bad and Boujee is definitive of this time in America, of American culture, so I agree with Donald that they represent culture in a really massive way.

Image copyright
JP Yim

Image caption

Steve wearing clothes from Dim Mak’s fashion line

You had a new punk-influenced fashion collection showcased during New York fashion week, is this about scaling up ‘Steve Aoki’ the brand?

I’ve been involved in fashion in one form or another for a long time, when I was 15 I was screen-printing shirts in my mum’s house for my first band and selling them on the road. So I knew it was something I wanted to do but it took a crazy long time for the Dim Mak collection to be ready.

We wanted to showcase it in the right way and so we turned the runway into a skate ramp so the energy of the [clothing] line was matched visually by what people were seeing as the skaters modelled the clothes.

You didn’t bother training models to skate then?

That would have been a disaster, we got some of New York’s best skaters that really knew how to rep the brand.

Image copyright
JASON CONNOLLY

Image caption

Steve says of US protests: ‘I’m excited about the voices and the people that are going to be speaking out.’

Lots of articles claimed New York fashion week was notable for how political some of the shows were. What is it like being a creative person working in Donald Trump’s America? Especially as a second-generation immigrant.

This is probably the worst period of time that I have lived in America, under this dictator-style, fascist president who is pushing his regime and clearing the rights of minorities, immigrants, women, the LGBT community, across the board – there are major steps backwards.

But one thing is for certain – the world is noticing that America itself is coming together and uniting as a voice. That’s why punk happened in the early 70s because it was the voice of protest and rebellion post-Vietnam and now its happening again. We’re having a renaissance. I’m excited about the voices and the people that are going to be speaking out.

There’s a lot of creative spirit, especially in music and the arts and fashion, it’s all part of a larger thing. The Rage Against The Machines of the world, they’re going to come back and inspire more people.

Can we expect some politically-charged material from you?

I can’t help it, it’s in my DNA and I’m not one to sit on the fence especially when something like this has shown its face. When I post something political or anti-Trump on my Facebook, some of the comments I get, you can’t believe how much ignorance is out there.

I might lose some fans by not staying neutral but I don’t have a choice, I have to use my voice.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39068521

The cast of BroadchurchImage copyright
ITV

Image caption

The ITV drama is set in a fictional town in Dorset

Broadchurch is back for its third and final series – and has gone down well with TV critics.

Olivia Colman and David Tennant are back as DS Ellie Miller and DI Alec Hardy, this time investigating the rape of a woman in the fictional Dorset town.

She’s played by former Coronation Street actress Julie Hesmondhalgh.

Jodie Whittaker and Andrew Buchan return to play Beth and Mark Latimer, along with Arthur Darvill as local vicar Paul Coates.

Image copyright
ITV

Image caption

Julie Hesmondhaigh plays a middle-aged woman who is violently raped

Other cast members include Lenny Henry, Georgina Campbell, Sarah Parish, Charlie Higson and Mark Bazeley.

The first episode, shown on Monday night, drew 7.5 million viewers.

That fell slightly short of the first episode of series two, which launched in 2015 to 7.6 million.

The debut episode of the first series, shown in 2013, pulled in 6.8 million.

Here’s what the TV critics had to say about the start of the new series.

Image copyright
ITV

Image copyright
ITV

Image copyright
ITV

Image copyright
ITV

Image copyright
ITV

Image copyright
ITV

Read the full reviews from the Daily Mail, The Independent, the Daily Express, the Telegraph, The Times (subscription required) and the Radio Times.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39115192

Martha Ruiz and Brian Cullinan of PriceWaterhouseCoopersImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Martha Ruiz and Brian Cullinan before Sunday’s Oscars ceremony

The man in charge of the Oscars awards envelopes has been blamed for the gaffe that saw La La Land named best picture.

PriceWaterhouseCoopers accountant Brian Cullinan was supposed to hand the best picture envelope to presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway on Sunday.

In a statement, PwC said he “mistakenly handed [them] the back-up envelope for actress in a leading role instead.”

It’s also emerged that Cullinan tweeted a picture of Emma Stone backstage just minutes before the mix-up took place.

The tweet has since been deleted, though it survives on various websites and on a cached Google page.

Image copyright
@briancullinan_

Cullinan had a complete set of envelopes on one side of the stage, while Martha Ruiz, another PwC accountant, had a duplicate set on the other.

This explains why both best actress winner Emma Stone and Beatty ended up in possession of an envelope related to the best actress award.

Beatty was evidently confused by the contents of the envelope, passing the card onto his former Bonnie and Clyde co-star.

Seeing the words “La La Land” beneath Emma Stone’s name, Dunaway declared her musical romance the winner of the best picture award.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty famously co-starred in 1967′s Bonnie and Clyde

Only after that film’s producers had begun their acceptance speeches was it revealed that Moonlight had in fact won the award.

“Once the error occurred, protocols for correcting it were not followed through quickly enough by Mr Cullinan or his partner,” said the accountancy firm.

One of Cullinan’s colleagues told Variety that the accountant “feels very, very terrible” and “is very upset about this mistake”.

The mix-up brought a chaotic end to Sunday’s Oscars ceremony, hosted in Los Angeles by talk show host Jimmy Kimmel.

Here are six more things we’ve learned about one of the most extraordinary awards show debacles in recent times.

1) The Academy is really, really sorry

The organisers of the Academy Awards “deeply regret the mistakes” that led to La La Land being wrongly named best picture.

Moonlight had actually won the award, but the envelope mix-up led to Dunaway announcing the wrong film.

“We apologise to the entire cast and crew of La La Land and Moonlight whose experience was profoundly altered by this error,” the Academy said.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Ryan Gosling (left) reacts to Moonlight being confirmed as best picture

“We salute the tremendous grace they displayed under the circumstances.”

In its statement, the Academy said PwC had “taken full responsibility for the breaches of established protocols that took place during the ceremony.

“We have spent last night and today investigating the circumstances, and will determine what actions are appropriate going forward.”

2) It was all down to Trump

President Trump and his policies were at the forefront of many attendees’ minds on Sunday, with Gael Garcia Bernal among those to take issue with them on stage.

“As a Mexican, as a Latin-American, as a migrant worker, as a human being, I’m against any form of wall that separates us,” the actor said – a reference to Trump’s plans to build a border wall between Mexico and the US.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Gael Garcia Bernal presented an award on Sunday with actress Hailee Steinfeld

In his first comments on the Oscars, the president has suggested the awards “were focused so hard on politics that they didn’t get the act together at the end”.

“It was a little sad,” he told the right-wing Breitbart website. “It took away from the glamour of the Oscars. It didn’t feel like a very glamorous evening.

“I’ve been to the Oscars,” continued the president. “There was something very special missing, and then to end that way was sad.”

3) It didn’t help the ratings

The extraordinary end to Sunday’s ceremony came too late to help boost the show’s ratings, which were its smallest for almost 10 years.

ABC’s broadcast drew 32.9 million viewers in the US – a 4 per cent drop on the 2016 Oscars, which were seen by 34.4 million people.

It was the smallest audience since the 2008 ceremony, which drew an average audience of 32 million.

Despite the decline, the Oscars are still expected to be the most-watched non-sporting event on US TV this year.

4) Kimmel was meant to end the show with Matt Damon

Back in his usual slot on late night television, Jimmy Kimmel revealed that he had originally intended to end the show in the audience, sat next to actor Matt Damon.

“We’re sitting there and we notice some commotion going on,” the Oscars host explained on Monday’s edition of Jimmy Kimmel Live. “And Matt says, ‘I think I heard the stage manager say they got the winner wrong.’

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Kimmel was meant to end the show next to Matt Damon, with whom he’d previously sparred

“So you just kind of, well, the host will go onstage and clear this up. And then I remember, oh, I’m the host.”

“Have any of you here ever hosted the Oscars before?” Kimmel asked his audience. “Well, except for the end – it was a lot of fun.”

The result, he joked, “was the weirdest TV finale since Lost” – a reference to the long-running US drama series about strangers stranded on a tropical island.

5) Faye Dunaway’s heels may have been involved

According to Tuesday’s Daily Mail, Beatty and Dunaway were meant to have descended a staircase before presenting the final award of the evening.

But the paper claims the 76-year-old had difficulty climbing up the stairs in her high heels, so the pair started their presentation walk at the foot of the stairs instead.

“It’s unclear whether this confusion contributes to the ensuing chaos,” the paper’s report continues.

6) The US State Department also had Twitter issues

The US State Department’s official Persian-language Twitter account tweeted congratulations to the Iranian people and Asghar Farhadi after the director’s film The Salesman won the best foreign language film award.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Farhadi’s award was accepted on his behalf by Iranian-American scientists Firouz Naderi and Anousheh Ansari

That was despite Farhadi, who did not attend the ceremony, having a speech read out in which he described President Trump’s travel ban as “inhumane”.

A State department spokeswoman said the tweet was deleted “to avoid any misperception that the USG [US government] endorsed the comments made in the acceptance speech.”


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39112851

Vanity Fair’s party is the one to go to after the Oscars, and the invitees are letting their hair down before they get through the door.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39103491

Yusra Warsama in Call the Midwife

Image caption

Yusra Warsama played a Somali woman called Nadifa who had been through FGM

Call the Midwife has been praised by viewers for tacking female genital mutilation (FGM) in its latest episode.

The episode featured a pregnant Somali woman who had undergone the procedure as a child, leading her to go through a traumatic delivery.

Viewers called the programme’s makers “brave” and praised the show for its “sensitive” portrayal of the subject.

More than 8.5 million tuned in to watch the episode, giving the 1960s-set drama 36% of the audience share.

“Maybe this despicable practice will be confined to history with coverage like this,” the author Jan Harvey tweeted. “Well done @BBCOne brave.”

Another viewer tweeted: “Seriously impressed with @BBCOne for raising the issue of #FGM.”

Image copyright
Twitter

Image copyright
Twitter

Anti-FGM campaigner Nimco Ali, who runs the charity Daughters of Eve, was a consultant on the show.

She worked closely with the programme makers and travelled to Somaliland, where the character of Nadifa is from, to meet doctors dealing with FGM.

Image copyright
Twitter

Image copyright
Twitter

The programme was followed by tweets from the NHS and the NSPCC offering advice, help and support.

Writer Caitlin Moran called the episode “important TV”, while Sarah Doran wrote in the Radio Times: “It’s high time naysayers acknowledged #CallTheMidwife is one of UK TV’s most powerful dramas.”

Earlier this month Charlene James received a Critics’ Circle Theatre Award for Cuttin’ It, a drama about female genital mutilation that toured the UK last year.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39104244

Beyonce and Ariana GrandeImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Beyonce and Ariana Grande are among the singers to have launched their own perfumes

One of the first things many of us notice when we meet someone is what sort of perfume or aftershave they’re wearing.

That was certainly the case when I met up with my friend Kerrie the other week and asked why she smelled of bliss on toast.

“Midnight Fantasy by Britney Spears,” she replied.

Now, I obviously appreciate Britney as pop royalty, but I was surprised such an arresting scent would have a celebrity’s name attached to it.

Not long ago, fragrances were associated with well-established, fashionable names such as Ralph Lauren or couture brands like Chanel.

But the number of celebrity perfumes on the market has rocketed in the last decade.

Why? Two words: Jennifer Lopez.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Jennifer Lopez has launched several fragrances since the success of Glow in 2006

“Glow changed everything,” says Chandler Burr, the former scent critic for the New York Times and author of several books on the subject.

He credits Lopez’s first fragrance, which was released in 2002, with triggering a deluge of deodorants.

“Elizabeth Taylor was one of the first [to have her own scent], but Glow kicked the whole thing into overdrive,” he says.

Lopez had sparked what Jezebel brilliantly described as the “scentocalpyse”.

Suddenly, everyone and their goldfish had a scent of their own. And they sold by the truckload.

“Brands can see a huge surge in sales and awareness when a celebrity face resonates with their audience,” says Gill Smith, managing director of The Perfume Shop.

She cites Beyonce and Ariana Grande’s ranges as some of the store’s most popular products.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Gigi Hadid is a brand ambassador for Tommy Hilfiger while Kendall Jenner has helped Estee Lauder launch its fragrance Modern Muse

So, what is the appeal of celebrity fragrances? “Identification and intimacy,” says Burr.

“Scent is an affordable unit of a star. Assuming the celebrity has actually been involved in its creation, a scent constitutes identification with that star viscerally and intimately. It is, in a small way, meeting them.”

Perfumes ideally have to match the celebrity’s image while also appealing to their core audience (which explains why pop stars with younger fanbases have fragrances with sugary sweet smells.)

Smith says: “We all still aspire to be more like our idols and connecting through a fragrance is one way of doing that.

“Britney Spears has stood the test of time. Diehard fans who wore Britney Fantasy over 12 years ago are still coming to us to try her new fragrances.”

Image copyright
iStock

Image caption

The prestige fragrance market was worth £1.25bn in the UK last year

This is probably a good moment for me to make a confession. And, before I start, it’s not something I’m proud of, ok?

It was August 2014. I’d been to Spain on holiday and was in the duty free section of Barcelona Airport.

Early, bored and trying to get rid of the last of my euros, I was spraying various aftershaves up and down my arm when one caught my nose.

I looked at the bottle and was surprised to see it was something called The Secret by Antonio Banderas.

So I bought it, and was duly mocked by my friends for having spent money on something called The Secret by Antonio Banderas.

But it did make me realise that, if something smells good, it will sell regardless.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Britney Spears and Antonio Banderas have both launched multiple fragrances

For celebrities who don’t want to release a fragrance under their own name, the mere act of endorsing an existing brand can have a huge impact.

“Johnny Depp as the face of Dior Sauvage has helped to drive awareness for that fragrance,” Smith says. “Eighteen months after launch it’s still one of our top 10 sales every day.

“Other examples include Gigi Hadid with Tommy Girl; Jared Leto with Gucci; and Estee Lauder Modern Muse with Kendall Jenner.”

She adds: “More recently the announcement of Guerlain working with Angelina Jolie has given a more traditional fragrance house a celebrity boost.”

The stigma around celebrity fragrances may have faded over the last few years – but now the sales are fading, too.

It’s a decline that started several years ago in the US.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Sales of premium brands like Prada and Chanel have increased in the UK

“We saw it in 2008 right after the crash, and it’s now a given in the US industry that the celebrity market has collapsed – or at lest hugely shrunk,” Burr explains.

“Rihanna and a few others have scents that are doing well, but it’s nothing like before.”

Consumers in the UK appear to be turning their noses up at them too.

Figures released by market research group National Purchase Diary (NPD) show sales of celebrity fragrances declined by £12m in the UK last year – a drop of 22%.

But the fragrance market as a whole actually grew by 1.4% – so it’s not that people stopped buying perfume, just that they’re less drawn to celebrities.

Just look at the sales of couture brands like Prada, Chanel and Dior, which collectively saw a 6% increase last year.

Image caption

One Direction launched their own fragrance in 2013 (when they were still a five-piece)

“The decline in celebrity perfumes is something we noticed in the past two years – it’s not something we see normally,” says Teresa Fisher, senior account manager in UK Beauty at NPD.

That decline, she points out, could partly be down to fewer launches.

“The market was very healthy a few years ago because there were a lot of celebrity fragrances around,” Fisher says.

“We saw One Direction and James Bond scents generate market growth, but now we aren’t seeing as many celebrity launches.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Rihanna as well as British stars like Alesha Dixon have all launched perfumes

There might be fewer celebrities cologne-ising the shelves (sorry), but Smith says the market is still strong.

“It’s definitely not the end of celebrity fragrance, we do still believe there is a place in the market for them,” she says.

“Customers still want celebrity perfumes as long as it is the right celebrity, and the right scent.”

The right scent, of course, is the crucial part.

When he was the NYT’s scent critic, Burr famously awarded Britney’s Midnight Fantasy four stars, implying there should be no snobbery about celebrities if the smell itself is good.

He cites Sarah Jessica Parker’s Lovely as one of the best of the celebrity fragrances he came across and is now even developing his own, called You or Someone Like You.

Image copyright
iStock

Image caption

The flood of new celebrity fragrances onto the market was described as a “scentocalypse”

Fisher says: “I think overall what we’re seeing is the polarisation of the fragrance market.

“At one end, consumers look for value for money, they go for promotions and maybe celebrity fragrances. But at the other, consumers are becoming more selective.

“Rather than buying 10 times a year maybe they buy five times a year. They’re spending the same amount of money but going towards a more niche or premium offering.”

The fragrance industry was worth £1.25bn in the UK last year, and shows no signs of slowing any time soon.

But if the current sales trends continue, there could well be far fewer famous faces plastered across perfumes in the future.

Expect your next birthday present to be a bottle of Jean Paul Gaultier rather than Justin Bieber.


Celebrity fragrances: A brief history

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Sophia Loren and Elizabeth Taylor were among the first to have their own fragrances

  • Audrey Hepburn and Joan Crawford famously endorsed fragrances by Givenchy and Estee Lauder respectively, while Catherine Deneuve became the face of Chanel no 5 in the 1970s
  • Sophie Loren was one of the first to have a fragrance of her own – releasing Sophia by Coty in 1981
  • Elizabeth Taylor later released her own range of perfumes, and her 1991 White Diamonds scent went on to become the best-selling celebrity fragrance of all time
  • But Jennifer Lopez’s Glow, released in 2006, was a turning point – inspiring hundreds of famous faces to get in on the act
  • The trend made its way to the UK, with British celebrities such as David Beckham, Alesha Dixon, Little Mix and Tulisa all releasing their own fragrances.
  • In 2016, celebrity fragrances made up 4% of the prestige fragrance market, with fashion brands like Boss or Armani making up 53% and around a third coming from couture brands like Chanel or Prada

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38756997

Fashion expert Alex Eagle casts her eye over the best dressed stars on the red carpet at the Academy Awards.

Grey line 2 pixels

Naomie Harris

Naomie HarrisImage copyright
Ian West / PA

This is my standout look of the night. We’ve all been so excited to see Raf Simons’ first work with Calvin Klein, and this white dress just perfectly encapsulates his directional take on femininity and glamour. Here his signature cool clean lines, with unexpected details like the cut out and the squared off train, are heightened by the stunning crust of sequins. And Naomie hasn’t gone overboard with the details – simple hair, asymmetric crystal suede sandals, also by Calvin Klein, and Bulgari jewellery.

We often imagine that Oscar dresses should look like an old-fashioned fairy tale princess fantasy, and I love the idea that the modern fairy tale princess ideal is more pared back. Naomie looks amazing, and also entirely like herself – not over the top but incredibly glamorous.

I also love that Raf reached out to dress not just Naomi but her Moonlight co-stars, having seen the film and been blown away by it. It’s a great example of fashion and Hollywood being inspired by each other.

Grey line 2 pixels

Emma Stone

Emma StoneImage copyright
Jordan Strauss / Invision / AP

Obviously it’s great that Emma Stone won an Oscar while dressed a bit like an Oscar, but this dress is also just perfect – for her, the film she is nominated for and for the ceremony.

One of Riccardo Tisci’s last designs before he stepped down from Givenchy, it exudes gilded era old-school glamour, just like La La Land, and the ombre fringing brings a playfulness that fits with Emma’s whole vibe. Great jewellery too from Tiffany Co, and a dash of politics with the addition of a gold Planned Parenthood pin.

Grey line 2 pixels

Pharrell Williams

Pharrell WilliamsImage copyright
Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Pharrell is a guy who is always having fun with fashion, but after years where his style has been dominated by the big hat, it was really nice to see him graduate to looking unquestionably stylish – while still pushing the envelope.

This look is head-to-toe-to-necklace Chanel – not a brand you often see men wearing on the red carpet – but entirely in keeping with Pharrell’s creative energy.

Grey line 2 pixels

Nicole Kidman

Nicole KidmanImage copyright
Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

Nicole looks beautiful in this Armani Privé gown – she really is the master of what works for her and always looks exquisite. The shape reminds me of the vivid yellow John Galliano for Dior dress she wore to such acclaim in 1997.

Twenty years on, she has pared back the colour, but the glamour remains high octane, with the all-over embroidery and streamlined silhouette. I love her Harry Winston jewels too.

Grey line 2 pixels

Dev Patel

Dev PatelImage copyright
Mike Blake / Reuters

Dev really stood out for me. I love that he’s a young British guy in the definitive British brand, Burberry. And that he’s been brave enough to play with the classics, with the white jacket that fit so perfectly.

It’s rare that you get excited about what the guys wear as they do so often stick to a formula – either boring or a little too much creativity – so seeing Dev combining creativity with cool was great. Also, having his mum as his date was classy as anything.

Grey line 2 pixels

Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle HuppertImage copyright
Mike Blake / Reuters

I love how French Isabelle looks, while still taking the glamour of the Hollywood red carpet seriously. She often wears trouser suits and tailoring for award shows, so it’s interesting that she’s chosen to go down the dress route.

This is by Armani Privé, which she has worn before and obviously trusts, and which is known for playing with a more androgynous style for women. It’s demure but elegant, adding drama with the sequins. But the best bit for me is how she’s styled it – adding edge with the Repossi ear cuff, laid back hair, deep lipstick and dark nail varnish.

She just looks so cool.

Grey line 2 pixels

Viola Davis

Viola DavisImage copyright
Jordan Strauss / Invision / AP

Such a wonderful moment for Davis winning her Best Supporting Actress award, and also a great moment of true, old-school Oscars glamour from her on the red carpet. Another one from Armani Privé, who were one of the most popular designers this year. While the gown is quite restrained in cut, the details bring it bang up to date – from the vivid red tone to the cutaway neckline and shoulder draping.

I love her hair too – really fresh and elegant.

Grey line 2 pixels

Brie Larsen

Brie LarsenImage copyright
Ian West / PA

Last year, Brie was a vision in blue Gucci when she won the Best Actress award. This year, she’s gone a little darker and more grown up in this stunning ruffled Oscar de la Renta gown, designed by his successors Fernando Garcia and Laura Kim.

It’s sleek but dramatic, without looking overdone at all. The Aquazzura shoes are a great touch, as is keeping everything else really simple – the ruffled hair and just earrings and a ring by Neil Lane.

I think she’s making a statement with this ensemble, that’s she’s no longer an ingénue – and black velvet is a great way to say it.

Grey line 2 pixels

Andrew Garfield

Andrew GarfieldImage copyright
Ian West / PA

I always look forward to seeing what Tom Ford wears on the red carpet, but in his absence Andrew Garfield nailed the dress code in this fantastic piece of Tom Ford tailoring.

The fabric, the texture, the cut – the combination is totally classic but feels fresh. In short, this is exactly what you want from a man in a tux.

Grey line 2 pixels

Dakota Johnson

Dakota JohnsonImage copyright
Angela Weiss / AFP

This dress was probably the most fashion forward of the night – coming from designer of the moment Alessandro Michele at Gucci. I love the delicate champagne shade which offset the va va voom ruching and bow detail at the front. It’s a great choice for a young starlet, sensual without being overtly sexy, considered without being laboured.

She’s also kept everything else quite simple – aside from some staggering Cartier jewels.

Grey line 2 pixels

Michelle Williams

Michelle WilliamsImage copyright
Ian West / PA

It’s great to see relationships between actors and designers develop. Michelle and Nicolas Ghesquiere at Louis Vuitton have been collaborating for years now, and the dresses she wears always seem to express their mutual understanding. This is quite a radical look – the low plunge of the neckline is a bit more revealing than what we are used to from Michelle, but it is beautifully offset by her gamine haircut and jewel-encrusted skirt.

Ghesquiere is great at forging relationships with some of the most interesting actresses – he’s been working closely with Alicia Vikander for a couple of years now, and she looked great in a black lace Spanish-infused gown by him. In fact, both Michelle and Alicia prove how creative it can be to remain loyal to one designer. Neither of them ever look formulaic in Louis Vuitton – they always look like the dress has been designed specifically for them, to make them feel the most comfortable and chic. What more could you want?

Alex Eagle is owner, creative director and designer at Alex Eagle Studio

Follow our Oscars board on Pinterest

All photographs subject to copyright.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-39099366

Moonlight producers Jeremy Kleiner and Adele Romanski with director Barry JenkinsImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Moonlight producers Jeremy Kleiner and Adele Romanski with director Barry Jenkins

Even if the best picture announcement had happened smoothly and to plan, Moonlight’s win would still have been regarded as one of the biggest Oscar stories and upsets of recent times.

What could have helped it to victory over La La Land, the favourite heading into the ceremony? Well, there are various factors that might, just might have come into play.

Firstly, of course, Moonlight is an exceptional piece of film-making. And it may well be that its coming-of-age theme, sumptuous photography and nuanced performances simply ended up resonating more strongly with voters than any of the rival films that were also nominated for best picture.

In 2016, after two years of #OscarsSoWhite, the Academy invited a large number of individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds to join and take part in voting. The Academy remains overwhelmingly white and male, although slightly less so than before.

If it was a very close race, a somewhat more diverse membership may have been a factor.

Image copyright
A24

Image caption

Jenkins on the Moonlight set with actor Mahershala Ali

The Academy operates a preferential voting ballot. This means that one film could potentially receive the most votes as members’ favourite film – which would give it victory in a first-past-the-post system of the kind employed by others, including Bafta – but still be beaten to the award by another film which had gained a significant proportion of second-favourite choices across the board.

La La Land has led the race since it premiered at the Venice Film Festival last August to rave reviews. By the time many Oscar voters saw the movie, some may have felt that after months of superlative after superlative being heaped up on it, it had been excessively hyped.

With the current political atmosphere in the United States, many Oscar voters may have thought that this was a time to honour a film that felt like a particularly important piece of work. Excellent as La La Land is, a win for the singing, dancing love letter to Los Angeles may have felt too frothy and self congratulatory.

Image copyright
Altitude Film

Image caption

Moonlight tells the story of a boy struggling with poverty and his sexuality in Miami

Moonlight, a film about acceptance and struggle, certainly feels like a movie that is more than a simple piece of entertainment.

The Academy has around 6,500 members, and the reasons they will have voted the way that they did, of course, could and probably did vary wildly from voter to voter.

The Academy doesn’t release voting figures, so there’s no way of knowing how emphatic Moonlight’s victory was. It could have come down to one vote, it could have won by a landslide.

But Moonlight winning against a film that seemed to be a runaway favourite is a huge achievement. And there’s no doubt that Barry Jenkins’ story following a character from childhood to manhood is a more than worthy winner of cinema’s biggest prize.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39107325

Moonlight editor Joi McMillon looks on, with award presenter Warren Beatty in the foregroundImage copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Moonlight editor Joi McMillon looked on, with award presenter Warren Beatty in the foreground

It looked like it was going to be the least exciting Oscars ever. In the end, it turned out to be the craziest.

When La La Land’s name was read out as the winner of the prize for best picture, that seemed to confirm this year’s Oscars as being even more predictable and unmemorable than usual.

But two minutes 22 seconds later, all hell broke loose.

Media captionThe moment La La Land’s producers realised Moonlight had won best picture

Later, in the Oscars press room, I asked the official Academy Awards historian, who knows everything there is to know about the Oscars and is on hand to answer journalists’ questions, if anything like this had ever happened before.

Her eyes glanced down, a sheepish look came over her face, and she replied: “Not that I know of.”

This just does not happen. This is the Oscars. And this is best picture – the final and most prestigious prize of the night.

But it has happened – they announced the wrong winner, and 2017 now has an indelible place in Oscars history.

Image copyright
AFP

Image caption

The mistake was revealed while La La Land producer Marc Platt was giving his acceptance speech

Until that point, the biggest upset was Hacksaw Ridge beating La La Land to the award for best film editing. That’s how exciting it was.

But La La Land was hot favourite to win best picture, so no-one was surprised when its name was read out.

Its producers were midway through their well-polished acceptance speeches when hell began to break loose.

Perhaps it was worth the mistake to hear La La producer Jordan Horowitz’s line, delivered during that heady two minutes 22 seconds: “There’s a lot of love in this room, and let’s use it to create and champion bold and diverse work – work that inspires us towards joy, towards hope and towards empathy.”

He could have been referring to Moonlight. And when he was told of the mix-up shortly afterwards, his quick and uncomplaining concession to Moonlight was admirable.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

La La Land’s Jordan Horowitz embraced Moonlight’s Barry Jenkins

“I’m going to be really proud to hand this to my friends from Moonlight,” he said before embracing that film’s incredulous crew and relinquishing the golden statuette.

Every time the TV cameras cut away to a celebrity in the audience, each was wearing the same look – astonishment and disbelief. Unbelievable.

La La Land’s leading lady Emma Stone was also gracious after defeat was snatched from the jaws of victory – although winning best actress probably softened the blow.

In the press room, she seemed unperturbed by the turn of events.

“God I love Moonlight so much,” she said. “I’m so excited for Moonlight. Of course it was an amazing thing to hear La La Land, and I would love to win best picture.

“But we are so excited for Moonlight. I think it is one of the best films of all time.”

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Moonlight’s Mahershala Ali and La La Land’s Emma Stone: No hard feelings

Let’s hope, in that case, that Moonlight isn’t just remembered as that film that won in that year the Oscars messed up and spoiled La La Land’s party.

It is a worthy winner, and deserves to be remembered as a beautiful, tender, touching, clever, bold work of art.

And let’s hope, for that matter, that this fiasco is not forever attached to the memory of La La Land.

It would have been a worthy winner too – it is an audacious, magical, transporting cinematic achievement.

And the fact that the directors of both films are in their 30s, and have been recognised as major new talents during this awards season, bodes well for future Oscar years. Perhaps there will be a rematch.

The commotion also overshadowed the rest of the night’s winners, who may have been largely predictable but were no less deserving.

Media caption‘It’s like witnessing a fire!’

Viola Davis and Mahershala Ali were hugely popular best supporting actress and actor victors respectively, and delivered powerful personal speeches.

The closest acting race was for best actor – where Casey Affleck triumphed over Denzel Washington, meaning history wasn’t made by giving three of the four acting trophies to black stars.

However, two African-American winners is a welcome result after two years of #OscarsSoWhite.

As well as diversity, the other issue that was supposed to dominate the show was politics.

This was meant to be the year when Hollywood railed against Donald Trump. And there were references to the current political turmoil.

Presenting one award, Mexican actor Gael Garcia Bernal said: “I’m against any sort of wall that wants to separate us.”

Moonlight’s Barry Jenkins indirectly referred to the president, telling those who feel underrepresented: “For the next four years, we will not leave you alone, we will not forget you.”

And ceremony host Jimmy Kimmel touched on the topic throughout the night – in a flippant way.

Absent winner’s message

The main political statement came when Iranian director Asghar Farhadi won best foreign language film – but was not there to collect the award because he stayed away in protest at Mr Trump’s attempted travel ban.

Instead, he sent a message saying: “Dividing the world into the us and our enemies categories creates fear. A deceitful justification for aggression and war.”

The four acting winners completely steered clear of overtly political statements.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Casey Affleck: “I didn’t say anything [political] because my head was completely blank”

“Man, I wish I had something bigger and more meaningful to say,” best actor winner Casey Affleck said from the podium.

Which is funny because he did have something bigger and more meaningful to say when he won an Independent Spirit Award just a day earlier.

At that ceremony, he said: “The policies of this administration are abhorrent and they will not last. They’re really un-American.”

‘It’s going to be history’

So did the actors and actresses chicken out of talking about politics at the Oscars?

Or did they realise that preaching would have done little to change minds and would have just alienated half of the country?

Affleck told the BBC backstage: “Personally, I didn’t say anything because my head was completely blank, [because of] the shock of winning the award and the terror of having a microphone in front of you and all of those faces staring at you.”

So it won’t be remembered as the political Oscars after all.

But at least it will be remembered.

“Is that the craziest Oscar moment of all time?” Emma Stone said of the best picture debacle. Pause. “Cool! It’s going to be history.”

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39101349

Media captionThe moment La La Land’s producers realised Moonlight had won best picture

With the wrong film being mistakenly named best picture at the Oscars – La La Land instead of Moonlight – lots of people are asking how this could have happened.

Two envelopes for each category

Two people count the votes and know the winners in advance. Each has a full set of envelopes containing cards with the winners’ names – just in case something happens to the other set.

Those people – from accountancy firm PwC – stand on either side of the Oscars stage and hand the envelopes to the award presenters just before they step on stage.

So after Emma Stone won best actress, the other best actress envelope was handed to Warren Beatty – who was presenting the best picture prize – by mistake.

That explains why a confused Stone told reporters afterwards: “I was holding my best actress in a leading role card that entire time.”

Image copyright
PwC

Image caption

Martha Ruiz and Brian Cullinan from Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC) are the only two people who know the results in advance

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty with the red envelope at the centre of the confusion

Warren Beatty hesitates

It looked like the veteran actor was fooling around when he opened the envelope, looked at the card, then looked inside the envelope again to see if there was another card inside.

He checked again, then showed the envelope to his co-presenter Faye Dunaway. She read the words: “La La Land.”

Beatty explained: “I want to tell you what happened. I opened the envelope, and it said Emma Stone, La La Land. That’s why I took such a long look at Faye, and at you [the audience], I wasn’t trying to be funny.”

Oscars host Jimmy Kimmel said afterwards: “He was confused because the card, which he showed to me by the way, said ‘Emma Stone, La La Land’ on it.

“So this was confusing obviously, we thought he was being coy and cute to make everybody suffer but in reality he was perplexed by why her name was on it.”

Image copyright
AP

Image caption

La La Land’s Jordan Horowitz gives his acceptance speech – unaware a mistake has been made

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Realisation dawns on the faces of the La La Land cast and crew as an official takes to the stage

Image copyright
AP

Image caption

Moonlight’s Mahershala Ali hugs Emma Stone, who won best actress for La La Land, as her co-star Ryan Gosling looks on, bemused

The mistake is rectified

With the La La Land acceptance speeches in full flow, the PwC people and other officials came on stage to inform the film’s cast and creators – and the world – that there had been a terrible mistake.

La La Land producer Fred Berger said: “We lost by the way, but you know.”

Fellow producer Jordan Horowitz then said: “Guys, I’m sorry, no, there’s a mistake. Moonlight, you guys won best picture.”

And the third producer Marc Platt said: “This is not a joke I’m afraid they read the wrong thing.”

Horowitz added: “This is not a joke, Moonlight has won best picture.” He then held the card up to the audience to prove his point, reading from it: “Moonlight, best picture.”

Cue bedlam.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Warren Beatty tries to explain what happened as the team behind Moonlight take in the news

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

The confusion turns to celebration as Moonlight’s win sinks in

Oscars 2017: Full coverage

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39097183