Archive for February, 2017


27 February 2017 Last updated at 06:35 GMT

The moment La La Land producer Jordan Horowitz realised Moonlight had actually won the best picture Oscar.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39100758

Media captionThe moment La La Land’s producers realised Moonlight had won best picture

Moonlight has won best picture at the Oscars – but only after an error saw La La Land initially declared the winner.

The La La Land team was in the middle of their acceptance speeches when the mistake was discovered and rectified.

PriceWaterhouseCooper, the accountancy firm responsible for counting the ballots, apologised for the mix-up.

La La Land still ended up the biggest winner of the night, taking home six Oscars including a best actress award for Emma Stone.

Moonlight’s surprise best picture win took its haul to three, the low-budget film having earlier won the adapted screenplay award and a best supporting actor prize for Mahershala Ali.

Casey Affleck was named best actor for Manchester by the Sea, while Viola Davis was named best supporting actress for Fences.

Damien Chazelle, La La Land’s 32-year-old director, became the youngest film-maker to win the best director Oscar.


Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

It was all smiles for the acting winners backstage

Acting winners

  • Casey Affleck – best actor, Manchester by the Sea
  • Emma Stone – best actress, La La Land
  • Mahershala Ali – best supporting actor, Moonlight
  • Viola Davis – best supporting actress, Fences

Read the best bits from the speeches


Yet this year’s ceremony will be remembered for its closing moments, when Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway arrived on stage to announced the best picture winner.

Beatty had been mistakenly handed the previous winner’s envelope, containing a card that said Emma Stone had won best actress for La La Land.

Image copyright
Kevin Winter

Image caption

Beatty looked unsure what to do when he opened the envelope

It was this card that Dunaway read from, mistakenly declaring La La Land to be best picture and creating what Stone later described as “the craziest Oscar moment of all time”.

In a statement, PriceWaterhouseCooper “sincerely” apologised for the error, which it said was down to the presenters having “mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope”.

“We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred.”

Host Jimmy Kimmel said he blamed Steve Harvey for the error – a reference to Harvey’s mistake in announcing the Miss Universe winner in 2015.

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Emma Stone (background, left) looked shocked at events

It was La La Land producer Jordan Horowitz who announced there had been a mistake.

“This is not a joke,” he told the audience, showing the correct card. “Moonlight is best picture.”

Beatty returned to the microphone to explain he had been given an envelope with Emma Stone’s name inside.

“That is why I took such a long look at Faye,” the veteran actor continued. “I wasn’t trying to be funny.”

Image copyright
AFP/getty

Image caption

Moonlight’s Barry Jenkins and La La Land’s Jordan Horowitz embrace after the mistake is rectified

“Very clearly even in my dreams this can’t be true,” said Moonlight director Barry Jenkins. “But to hell with it because this is true. It’s true, its not fake.”

Paying tribute to the team behind La La Land for the way they handled the mistake, he said: “We have been on the road with these guys and it was so gracious and so generous of them.”

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

The Moonlight director later watched the best film Oscar engraved

Speaking backstage, Emma Stone said it had been “an amazing thing to hear La La Land” named best picture.

“But we are so excited for Moonlight,” she continued. “I think it is one of the best films of all time.

“Is that the craziest Oscar moment of all time? Cool! It’s going to be history.”

La La Land’s other Oscars came for its cinematography, score and production design.

The Hollywood musical romance also won the best original song award for City of Stars, beating another song from its soundtrack in the process.

Kenneth Lonergan received the best original screenplay prize for Manchester by the Sea, which he also directed.

There were two awards too for Mel Gibson’s war film Hacksaw Ridge, which was recognised for its editing and its sound mixing.


Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39099454

David HarewoodImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

David Harewood has already appeared in the 2009 Doctor Who Christmas specials

Actor David Harewood has said the next Doctor Who should not be another white man – and has thrown his own hat into the ring.

The Homeland and Supergirl star is among the actors whose names have been suggested to replace Peter Capaldi.

“It’s nice to be in the running,” he told BBC News.

“It needs to do something different, so I think it’s either going to be a black person or a woman. It would just bring a different flavour to it.”

The 51-year-old British actor has already been in Doctor Who, appearing in the 2009-10 double bill The End of Time. He can currently be seen playing the Martian Manhunter in the CW’s Supergirl.

Image copyright
PA

Image caption

Tilda Swinton is the bookmakers’ favourite to replace Peter Capaldi

“I’m already playing an alien so maybe I could switch and play a Time Lord – who knows what’s going to happen,” he said. “It’s nice to be in the running. It’s an iconic role.”

The current bookmakers’ favourite to take over the Tardis is Oscar-winning actress Tilda Swinton, and Harewood said she would be a good choice.

“She’s extraordinary anyway so I think she’d be great,” Harewood said. “It would be a very different Doctor and maybe that’s what it needs.”

The actor said it was good that four of the five current favourites are women – with Maxine Peake, Phoebe Waller-Bridge and Olivia Colman also tipped.

Harewood was speaking at the Independent Spirit Awards in California, where he was nominated for best male lead for playing a Pentecostal minister trying to perform miracles in Free In Deed.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39093558

David HarewoodImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

David Harewood has already appeared in the 2009 Doctor Who Christmas specials

Actor David Harewood has said the next Doctor Who should not be another white man – and has thrown his own hat into the ring.

The Homeland and Supergirl star is among the actors whose names have been suggested to replace Peter Capaldi.

“It’s nice to be in the running,” he told BBC News.

“It needs to do something different, so I think it’s either going to be a black person or a woman. It would just bring a different flavour to it.”

The 51-year-old British actor has already been in Doctor Who, appearing in the 2009-10 double bill The End of Time. He can currently be seen playing the Martian Manhunter in the CW’s Supergirl.

Image copyright
PA

Image caption

Tilda Swinton is the bookmakers’ favourite to replace Peter Capaldi

“I’m already playing an alien so maybe I could switch and play a Time Lord – who knows what’s going to happen,” he said. “It’s nice to be in the running. It’s an iconic role.”

The current bookmakers’ favourite to take over the Tardis is Oscar-winning actress Tilda Swinton, and Harewood said she would be a good choice.

“She’s extraordinary anyway so I think she’d be great,” Harewood said. “It would be a very different Doctor and maybe that’s what it needs.”

The actor said it was good that four of the five current favourites are women – with Maxine Peake, Phoebe Waller-Bridge and Olivia Colman also tipped.

Harewood was speaking at the Independent Spirit Awards in California, where he was nominated for best male lead for playing a Pentecostal minister trying to perform miracles in Free In Deed.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39093558

It’s the biggest night of the year in Hollywood – the Oscars begin at 17:30 PST on Sunday (01:30 GMT on Monday). As the final preparations take place, here’s what to look out for in the main battles.

Best picture

Image copyright
Lionsgate

The frontrunner: La La Land

Surely, with a record-equalling 14 nominations, this will waltz off with the top award. It’s classic yet contemporary. It feels unlike any other modern film, yet feels so right. And it’s about the agony and ecstasy of “making it” in Hollywood. What could be more Oscar-friendly?

The challenger: Moonlight

A beautifully-crafted film and a beautifully-told story, Moonlight gives screen time to the type of central character that Hollywood doesn’t normally dwell on, or does so only as a stereotype – a poor, young, gay, black, marginalised man.

The outsider: Hidden Figures

This real-life story of three black, female mathematicians in a white, male world at Nasa in the 1960s has exceeded expectations at the US box office, and is the highest-grossing of the nine best picture nominees.

Best actress

Image copyright
PA

The frontrunner: Emma Stone (La La Land)

If La La Land is to sweep the board, then it will sweep Emma Stone along with it. She’s also at the age, and the stage of her career, at which the Academy likes to admit female stars to its A list.

The challenger: Isabelle Huppert (Elle)

The French actress won a Golden Globe for her role in rape revenge thriller Elle, and there’s a strong contingent that thinks the Oscars should give her the credit she deserves for her 40-year career.

The outsider: Natalie Portman (Jackie)

At one stage, Portman and Stone were neck-and-neck. The Academy loves stars who transform themselves into real-life legends, as Portman has with former US first lady Jackie Kennedy. But Jackie has underperformed at the box office and elsewhere in the Oscar nominations.

Best actor

Image copyright
Paramount

The frontrunner: Denzel Washington (Fences)

Denzel is probably the marginal favourite in this race. If he wins, he will become only the fourth man to have won three acting Oscars, and will be the oldest best actor winner for 25 years.

Or maybe the frontrunner is: Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea)

It’s a close call, and Casey is still very much in contention for his depiction of pent-up grief. But he has slipped back, partly because he’s hardly charmed the campaign circuit, and partly because of a shadow cast by sexual harassment claims dating back to 2010.

The outsider: Ryan Gosling (La La Land)

If Ryan Gosling wins best actor, then La La Land really will be sweeping everything before it.

Best supporting actress

Image copyright
Paramount

The frontrunner: Viola Davis (Fences)

Playing the same role that earned her a Tony Award on Broadway, Viola is, according to the bookies and the pundits, the surest thing in this year’s Oscars.

The challengers: Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Nicole Kidman (Lion), Octavia Spencer (Hidden Figures) and Michelle Williams (Manchester by the Sea) all gave fine performances. But they needn’t bother rehearsing an acceptance speech.

Best supporting actor

Image copyright
A24 Films

The frontrunner: Mahershala Ali (Moonlight)

Ali was the standout performer in Moonlight’s ensemble. And with a role in Hidden Figures also among his credits, he is another actor the Academy is ready to anoint as a major star.

The challenger: Dev Patel (Lion)

There’s a lot of love and a late surge of support for Patel, who has come of age as an actor eight years after his breakthrough film Slumdog Millionaire won eight Oscars.

The outsider: Jeff Bridges (Hell or High Water)

He may be supporting, but Bridges steals the show as a wizened, maverick Texas Ranger.

Best director

Image copyright
Reuters

The frontrunner: Damian Chazelle (La La Land)

La La Land is so beloved by the Academy that they’re likely to reward Chazelle’s vision and audacity – and the fact he’s made a film like this at the age of 32. He would be the youngest best director winner in Oscars history.

The challenger: Barry Jenkins (Moonlight)

But Moonlight also shows rare directorial acumen and marks the arrival of another major film-making talent in Jenkins, who would be the first African-American winner of this award.

The outsider: Mel Gibson (Hacksaw Ridge)

It would be a big statement to give the award to the Australian after his exile from Hollywood following notorious anti-Semitic, racist and misogynist outbursts. But then again, the Oscars did give this award to Roman Polanski in 2003, despite his own Hollywood exile after admitting unlawful sex with a 13-year-old girl.

How many Oscars will La La Land win?

The magical musical has a record-equalling 14 nominations. That includes two for best song – meaning it can win a maximum of 13 statuettes.

The record number of wins in Oscar history is 11 (Titanic, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and Ben-Hur). The record for a musical is 10 (West Side Story).

The hype has cooled a little, so La La Land will do well if it gets into double digits. It’s the favourite in 10 of the 13 categories in which it has nominations – the only ones in which it isn’t frontrunner are best actor, original screenplay and sound editing.

The most diverse Oscars ever?

After two years of #OscarsSoWhite, in which there were no non-white acting nominees, three of the four acting trophies could go to black actors this year.

If Denzel, Viola and Mahershala all triumph, it will be the first time that black performers will be in the majority when the four acting winners get together for that post-Oscars photo hug.

Who will mention Donald Trump?

A lot of people, probably, directly or indirectly. There’s a whole separate article on this.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Will Lin-Manuel Miranda get a PEGOT?

There is a select group of 12 people who have got what is known as an EGOT – the set of Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Awards.

There’s an even more select group of just two people (composers Richard Rodgers and Marvin Hamlisch) who have got a PEGOT – all the above plus a Pulitzer Prize.

Lin-Manuel Miranda, who created the Broadway smash Hamilton, currently has a PEGT – he’s just missing an O. He’s nominated for best song for How Far I’ll Go from Moana.

La La Land is hot favourite for that prize, of course. But could the fact it has two nominations in that category split the La La vote and let Lin-Manuel sneak in to complete the set?

Image copyright
AMPAS

21st time lucky for Oscar’s biggest loser?

Sound recording engineer Kevin O’Connell notched up his 21st Oscar nomination this year for his sound mixing work on Hacksaw Ridge.

That’s a great achievement – the shine only coming off it slightly when you consider the fact he’s never won.

This could be his year. It could. Except La La Land is standing in his way. So it won’t.

At the nominees’ luncheon group photo this year, the Academy placed him in the middle, next to the giant Oscars statuette – and the face he made shows he’s past caring.

Sibling rivalry for visual effects nominees

Two British brothers are nominated for best visual effects this year, for different films.

Paul Corbould is nominated for Doctor Strange, while Neil Corbould is shortlisted for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Neil has won twice before – for Gladiator and Gravity – while Paul, previously nominated for Guardians of the Galaxy, has never won.

It’s a talented family. There’s another visual effects wizard brother, Chris, who won an Oscar for Inception. Fortunately for the sake of preventing further family rivalry, he’s not nominated this year.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38716724

It’s the biggest night of the year in Hollywood – the Oscars begin at 17:30 PST on Sunday (01:30 GMT on Monday). As the final preparations take place, here’s what to look out for in the main battles.

Best picture

Image copyright
Lionsgate

The frontrunner: La La Land

Surely, with a record-equalling 14 nominations, this will waltz off with the top award. It’s classic yet contemporary. It feels unlike any other modern film, yet feels so right. And it’s about the agony and ecstasy of “making it” in Hollywood. What could be more Oscar-friendly?

The challenger: Moonlight

A beautifully-crafted film and a beautifully-told story, Moonlight gives screen time to the type of central character that Hollywood doesn’t normally dwell on, or does so only as a stereotype – a poor, young, gay, black, marginalised man.

The outsider: Hidden Figures

This real-life story of three black, female mathematicians in a white, male world at Nasa in the 1960s has exceeded expectations at the US box office, and is the highest-grossing of the nine best picture nominees.

Best actress

Image copyright
PA

The frontrunner: Emma Stone (La La Land)

If La La Land is to sweep the board, then it will sweep Emma Stone along with it. She’s also at the age, and the stage of her career, at which the Academy likes to admit female stars to its A list.

The challenger: Isabelle Huppert (Elle)

The French actress won a Golden Globe for her role in rape revenge thriller Elle, and there’s a strong contingent that thinks the Oscars should give her the credit she deserves for her 40-year career.

The outsider: Natalie Portman (Jackie)

At one stage, Portman and Stone were neck-and-neck. The Academy loves stars who transform themselves into real-life legends, as Portman has with former US first lady Jackie Kennedy. But Jackie has underperformed at the box office and elsewhere in the Oscar nominations.

Best actor

Image copyright
Paramount

The frontrunner: Denzel Washington (Fences)

Denzel is probably the marginal favourite in this race. If he wins, he will become only the fourth man to have won three acting Oscars, and will be the oldest best actor winner for 25 years.

Or maybe the frontrunner is: Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea)

It’s a close call, and Casey is still very much in contention for his depiction of pent-up grief. But he has slipped back, partly because he’s hardly charmed the campaign circuit, and partly because of a shadow cast by sexual harassment claims dating back to 2010.

The outsider: Ryan Gosling (La La Land)

If Ryan Gosling wins best actor, then La La Land really will be sweeping everything before it.

Best supporting actress

Image copyright
Paramount

The frontrunner: Viola Davis (Fences)

Playing the same role that earned her a Tony Award on Broadway, Viola is, according to the bookies and the pundits, the surest thing in this year’s Oscars.

The challengers: Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Nicole Kidman (Lion), Octavia Spencer (Hidden Figures) and Michelle Williams (Manchester by the Sea) all gave fine performances. But they needn’t bother rehearsing an acceptance speech.

Best supporting actor

Image copyright
A24 Films

The frontrunner: Mahershala Ali (Moonlight)

Ali was the standout performer in Moonlight’s ensemble. And with a role in Hidden Figures also among his credits, he is another actor the Academy is ready to anoint as a major star.

The challenger: Dev Patel (Lion)

There’s a lot of love and a late surge of support for Patel, who has come of age as an actor eight years after his breakthrough film Slumdog Millionaire won eight Oscars.

The outsider: Jeff Bridges (Hell or High Water)

He may be supporting, but Bridges steals the show as a wizened, maverick Texas Ranger.

Best director

Image copyright
Reuters

The frontrunner: Damian Chazelle (La La Land)

La La Land is so beloved by the Academy that they’re likely to reward Chazelle’s vision and audacity – and the fact he’s made a film like this at the age of 32. He would be the youngest best director winner in Oscars history.

The challenger: Barry Jenkins (Moonlight)

But Moonlight also shows rare directorial acumen and marks the arrival of another major film-making talent in Jenkins, who would be the first African-American winner of this award.

The outsider: Mel Gibson (Hacksaw Ridge)

It would be a big statement to give the award to the Australian after his exile from Hollywood following notorious anti-Semitic, racist and misogynist outbursts. But then again, the Oscars did give this award to Roman Polanski in 2003, despite his own Hollywood exile after admitting unlawful sex with a 13-year-old girl.

How many Oscars will La La Land win?

The magical musical has a record-equalling 14 nominations. That includes two for best song – meaning it can win a maximum of 13 statuettes.

The record number of wins in Oscar history is 11 (Titanic, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and Ben-Hur). The record for a musical is 10 (West Side Story).

The hype has cooled a little, so La La Land will do well if it gets into double digits. It’s the favourite in 10 of the 13 categories in which it has nominations – the only ones in which it isn’t frontrunner are best actor, original screenplay and sound editing.

The most diverse Oscars ever?

After two years of #OscarsSoWhite, in which there were no non-white acting nominees, three of the four acting trophies could go to black actors this year.

If Denzel, Viola and Mahershala all triumph, it will be the first time that black performers will be in the majority when the four acting winners get together for that post-Oscars photo hug.

Who will mention Donald Trump?

A lot of people, probably, directly or indirectly. There’s a whole separate article on this.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Will Lin-Manuel Miranda get a PEGOT?

There is a select group of 12 people who have got what is known as an EGOT – the set of Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Awards.

There’s an even more select group of just two people (composers Richard Rodgers and Marvin Hamlisch) who have got a PEGOT – all the above plus a Pulitzer Prize.

Lin-Manuel Miranda, who created the Broadway smash Hamilton, currently has a PEGT – he’s just missing an O. He’s nominated for best song for How Far I’ll Go from Moana.

La La Land is hot favourite for that prize, of course. But could the fact it has two nominations in that category split the La La vote and let Lin-Manuel sneak in to complete the set?

Image copyright
AMPAS

21st time lucky for Oscar’s biggest loser?

Sound recording engineer Kevin O’Connell notched up his 21st Oscar nomination this year for his sound mixing work on Hacksaw Ridge.

That’s a great achievement – the shine only coming off it slightly when you consider the fact he’s never won.

This could be his year. It could. Except La La Land is standing in his way. So it won’t.

At the nominees’ luncheon group photo this year, the Academy placed him in the middle, next to the giant Oscars statuette – and the face he made shows he’s past caring.

Sibling rivalry for visual effects nominees

Two British brothers are nominated for best visual effects this year, for different films.

Paul Corbould is nominated for Doctor Strange, while Neil Corbould is shortlisted for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

Neil has won twice before – for Gladiator and Gravity – while Paul, previously nominated for Guardians of the Galaxy, has never won.

It’s a talented family. There’s another visual effects wizard brother, Chris, who won an Oscar for Inception. Fortunately for the sake of preventing further family rivalry, he’s not nominated this year.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-38716724

Moonlight creators and castImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

The Moonlight cast and crew turned out for the California ceremony

The cast and creators of Moonlight have warmed up for Sunday’s Oscars by winning the top prize at Saturday’s Independent Spirit Awards.

The touching and beautifully-shot drama about growing up gay and black in Miami is seen as an outside bet to upset the La La Land bandwagon at the Oscars.

It confirmed its status as the awards circuit’s second favourite film with six Independent Spirit Awards.

La La Land wasn’t eligible for the awards, which reward low-budget films.

Moonlight was made for $1.5m (£1.2m) over 25 days – but has now recouped $21.5m (£17.3m) at the North American box office. It also has eight Oscar nominations, compared with La La Land’s 14.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Moonlight’s Barry Jenkins won best director and best screenplay

Key Independent Spirit Awards winners

  • Best feature – Moonlight
  • Best female lead – Isabelle Huppert, Elle
  • Best male lead – Casey Affleck, Manchester By The Sea
  • Best supporting female – Molly Shannon, Other People
  • Best supporting male – Ben Foster, Hell Or High Water
  • Best director – Barry Jenkins, Moonlight
  • Best screenplay – Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney, Moonlight

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Casey Affleck will find out on Sunday if he can add an Oscar to his Independent Spirit Award

In his acceptance speech, Casey Affleck, who won best male lead, gave a taste of the political tone that is likely to dominate the Oscars.

He told the ceremony: “The policies of this administration are abhorrent and they will not last. They’re really un-American.

“I know this feels preachy and boring and I’m preaching to the choir but I’m just lending my little voice to the chorus here.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Naomie Harris: “It’s going to be a very political year this year at the Oscars”

British actress Naomie Harris, who appears in Moonlight, said the current political climate is “definitely going to be reflected” at the Oscars.

“Really great art reflects society,” she told BBC News. “It also edifies us. It shows us a different way of operating. So I definitely think it’s going to be a very political year this year at the Oscars.”

She also said Moonlight has struck a chord because it has fed “our universal yearning for connection”.

She said: “We’re all yearning to connect, and I think in a society where we have so much technology that makes us feel as though we’re connected, but it’s not really about true connection. It’s not heartfelt connection.

“And that’s what we’re all longing for, and I think that, in Moonlight, is what’s demonstrated.”

The Independent Spirits ceremony is the traditional precursor to the Oscars and is one of the awards season’s more informal events. It honours films made for less than $20m (£16m).

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39093564

Moonlight creators and castImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

The Moonlight cast and crew turned out for the California ceremony

The cast and creators of Moonlight have warmed up for Sunday’s Oscars by winning the top prize at Saturday’s Independent Spirit Awards.

The touching and beautifully-shot drama about growing up gay and black in Miami is seen as an outside bet to upset the La La Land bandwagon at the Oscars.

It confirmed its status as the awards circuit’s second favourite film with six Independent Spirit Awards.

La La Land wasn’t eligible for the awards, which reward low-budget films.

Moonlight was made for $1.5m (£1.2m) over 25 days – but has now recouped $21.5m (£17.3m) at the North American box office. It also has eight Oscar nominations, compared with La La Land’s 14.

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Moonlight’s Barry Jenkins won best director and best screenplay

Key Independent Spirit Awards winners

  • Best feature – Moonlight
  • Best female lead – Isabelle Huppert, Elle
  • Best male lead – Casey Affleck, Manchester By The Sea
  • Best supporting female – Molly Shannon, Other People
  • Best supporting male – Ben Foster, Hell Or High Water
  • Best director – Barry Jenkins, Moonlight
  • Best screenplay – Barry Jenkins and Tarell Alvin McCraney, Moonlight

Image copyright
Reuters

Image caption

Casey Affleck will find out on Sunday if he can add an Oscar to his Independent Spirit Award

In his acceptance speech, Casey Affleck, who won best male lead, gave a taste of the political tone that is likely to dominate the Oscars.

He told the ceremony: “The policies of this administration are abhorrent and they will not last. They’re really un-American.

“I know this feels preachy and boring and I’m preaching to the choir but I’m just lending my little voice to the chorus here.”

Image copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Naomie Harris: “It’s going to be a very political year this year at the Oscars”

British actress Naomie Harris, who appears in Moonlight, said the current political climate is “definitely going to be reflected” at the Oscars.

“Really great art reflects society,” she told BBC News. “It also edifies us. It shows us a different way of operating. So I definitely think it’s going to be a very political year this year at the Oscars.”

She also said Moonlight has struck a chord because it has fed “our universal yearning for connection”.

She said: “We’re all yearning to connect, and I think in a society where we have so much technology that makes us feel as though we’re connected, but it’s not really about true connection. It’s not heartfelt connection.

“And that’s what we’re all longing for, and I think that, in Moonlight, is what’s demonstrated.”

The Independent Spirits ceremony is the traditional precursor to the Oscars and is one of the awards season’s more informal events. It honours films made for less than $20m (£16m).

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39093564

Brian MatthewImage copyright
PA

Image caption

Brian Matthew said he was “saddened” to play his last track as host of the legendary Radio 2 show

Veteran BBC Radio 2 broadcaster Brian Matthew has hosted his final edition of Sounds of the 60s, choosing a song from Billy Fury to end on.

The presenter said he had “enjoyed every minute of my 27 years in the chair” as he played the 1962 track, Last Night Was Made For Love.

It comes a month after the BBC said the 88-year-old host was retiring from the show because of ill health.

Matthew said he was “saddened” to leave but would return to Radio 2 soon.

As the last track played out on a show that compiled his favourite moments from the past 27 years, Matthew said: “I’ll be back on Radio 2 in the near future with something new, so keep your eyes open for further information.”

Image caption

Dermot O’Leary will present a new-look Radio 2 show at 08:00 to 10:00 on Saturday mornings

In January, Matthew had described the decision to take him off the show as “horrible”, having been with the station since 1954. Sounds of the 60s began in 1990.

The BBC said it was the “right time for him to step off the weekly treadmill” of presenting the show, as he had spent several months off air recuperating.

But in January, Matthew told the Daily Telegraph: “I was ready and willing and able to go back, and they’ve just said they are going to put the programme in the hands of other people.”

From 4 March, Tony Blackburn will present the two-hour programme at an earlier time of 06:00, a move which Blackburn said was an “absolute honour”.

Image caption

Tony Blackburn takes the reins at Sounds of the 60s from 4 March

Blackburn said: “To take over this show, 50 years after joining the BBC, is a real privilege and I can’t wait to get started.”

Sounds of the 60s’ previous 08:00 slot will be replaced by Dermot O’Leary’s show, with music entertainment and a Pause for Thought segment.

O’Leary said it was a “huge honour” to follow in Matthew’s footsteps. “Brian did such an incredible job for so many years,” he said.

‘Thanks for the memories’

Fellow broadcasters and listeners paid tribute to Matthew’s work on the programme.

BBC Radio 2 presenter Bob Harris said: “For more than 50 years from bantering with The Beatles to Sounds of the 60s, Brian Matthew has been my Saturday soundtrack. Thanks for the memories.”

“What a massive loss to radio this is,” said one fan, Sarah Jones. “Exceptional knowledge gone.”

Craig Wright said: “Sad that it’s Brian Matthew’s last [show]. The soundtrack to many a Saturday morning”.

Image copyright
Twitter

BBC Radio 2 said in a tweet that “we’ll miss” Matthew, adding that he will present future specials on his “life and times in music”.

Lewis Carnie, Radio 2′s head of programming, said Matthew was an “outstanding presenter and, at 88, a radio legend.”

He added: “He has made the programme his own with his natural ability, passion and warmth and we are incredibly grateful.”

Image caption

Brian Matthew, pictured in 1984

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-39089974

America has banned a 21-year-old Syrian behind an Oscar nominated documentary from entering the country.

Khaled Khatib did most of the filming for a British movie called The White Helmets.

It’s a 40 minute Netflix documentary about the Syrian Civil Defence, volunteers who risk their lives to rescue civilians.

It’s widely thought to be one of Britain’s best chances for an Oscar in the short documentary category.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wj4ncIEDxw

Khaled Khatib is part of the The White Helmets group (because they wear white helmets) and he helped film the organisation which operates in parts of rebel controlled Syria.

The country is in the midst of a bloody war which has killed an estimated 500,000 and a further 11 million have either fled their homes or the country.

Khaled Khatib was supposed to be flying in to America for the 89th Academy Awards from Turkey.

https://twitter.com/995Khaled/status/823901446039044097

But before he got on his plane US officials reported finding derogatory information about Khatib.

That’s an official term that can mean anything from terror connections to passport irregularities.

White Helmets

Sources in Ankara told the BBC the filmmaker had a problem with his passport.

And the US Department for Homeland Security has given a comment saying: “A valid travel document is required for travel to the United States.”

Khatib had previously told CNN: “If we win this award, it will show people across Syria that people around the world support them. It will give courage to every volunteer who wakes up every morning to run towards bombs.

“If I cannot enter the US, I will not give up: we know that we have many friends in US, that there are people that share our humanitarian values.

“I look forward to meeting them all one day.”

President Trump’s travel ban has had an effect on several high-profile people, until it was suspended by the courts.

Anti- travel ban protestors

The son of boxing legend Muhammad Ali was detained by immigration staff at a Florida airport earlier this month.

According to his lawyer, Muhammad Ali Jnr was repeatedly asked by immigration officials: “Are you Muslim?”

Ali Jr was born in Philadelphia, holds a US passport and has no criminal record.

An Australian children’s book author has also suggested she might never return to the US after she was detained by border control in LA airport.

Mem Fox, who is famous for her best-selling books including Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes and Possum Magic, was on her way to a conference when it happened a few weeks ago.

She told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation she was questioned for two hours in front of a room full of people.

“I have never in my life been spoken to with such insolence, treated with such disdain, with so many insults and with so much gratuitous impoliteness,” Fox said.

Find us on Instagram at BBCNewsbeat and follow us on Snapchat, search for bbc_newsbeat

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/39089364