Archive for December, 2017


Model of an AT-AT walkerImage copyright
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A towering model of a Star Wars attack vehicle stood at the entrance to the theatre

Stormtroopers, an AT-AT Walker and a panoply of droids brought the Star Wars universe to downtown Los Angeles at the premiere of The Last Jedi.

The much-anticipated first screening of the franchise’s latest episode was dedicated to the late Carrie Fisher, who died last December aged 60.

Fisher, playing General Leia, finished work on the movie before her death.

Writer-director Rian Johnson opened the screening with a tribute, urging fans to “have a blast… for Carrie”.

“I want to dedicate tonight to Carrie, who is up there right now flipping me the bird, saying ‘Damn it Rian, don’t you dare make this night a solemn tribute,’” said Johnson, who brought the stars of the film onstage to introduce it.

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Actors Mark Hamill, Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, Gwendoline Christie and Domhnall Gleeson were applauded at the premiere

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Reuters

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Carrie Fisher died last December after completing her work on the movie

Is it any good?

Formal reviews of the film have been embargoed until later in the week, but guests at the premiere have already been pouring out their thoughts on social media.

Joshus Yehl, editor of IGN Comics, said he gasped, laughed, screamed and cried at what might be “the best Star Wars movie ever”.

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Grae Drake, a senior editor with movie and TV review site Rotten Tomatoes, described it as “as epic and sweeping as all the other films combined” with moments “that will make your head pop off” – in a good way.

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Film critic Scott Mantz said The last Jedi was “a little too long and dragged in the middle”, but said it was a “worthy Episode VIII” – and that Luke Skywalker actor Mark Hamill was “awesome”.

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Meanwhile, Mark Hamill himself referenced the lyrics to the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band with a tweet from the auditorium, ending with a plea to fans to “keep the secrets of VIII”.

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Daisy Ridley: I deleted my social media

Princes William and Harry are stormtroopers in Last Jedi

Last Jedi: Four big questions we want answers to

Fisher given ‘amazing’ send-off in Last Jedi

What’s it about?

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (Episode VIII in the movie franchise that started in 1977) follows on from the 2015 film The Force Awakens, and opens with the Resistance trying to fight off Supreme Leader Snoke’s First Order, which is trying to take over the galaxy.

Meanwhile, leading character Rey (Daisy Ridley) is trying to persuade Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) to join the Resistance fight and bring a spark of hope to the rebels.

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Daisy Ridley met fans and signed autographs on the red carpet

“There hasn’t been a Star Wars movie yet that has explored war the way The Last Jedi has,” said John Boyega, who plays the heroic stormtrooper-turned-rebel Finn.

“It’s very messy. The categorising of good and evil is all mixed together.”

Oscar Isaac, who plays X-wing fighter pilot Poe Dameron, added: “It’s a dire situation, it’s critical. The Resistance is on its last legs.

“When you’re trying to survive, the First Order’s right on top of us, it is like war, where you’ve got to keep moving to try to survive. You feel the momentum of everything that happened in The Force Awakens just pushing to a critical mass.”

What will success look like?

Experts are predicting the movie – which opens on 15 December – will gross about $220m (£164m) on its opening weekend in the United States. That would push it into second place on the all-time list, ahead of Jurassic World but behind 2015′s The Force Awakens, which made some $248m on its opening weekend.

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Getty Images

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Longtime characters R2-D2 and C-3PO were among the droids represented on the red carpet

Gwendoline Christie, who plays stormtrooper commander Captain Phasma, said the franchise had an enduring appeal.

“I think it’s because the world we live in is a changing and evolving place that it retains the simplicity of those elements,” she said.

“But it really resonates with what it is to follow your own human, dark, narcissistic tendencies, where that will take you.”

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EPA

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Fans dressed up for the occasion, wearing Star Wars replica gear


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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-42300989

Max CliffordImage copyright
PA

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Max Clifford had been serving an eight-year jail sentence for sex offences

Disgraced celebrity publicist Max Clifford has died in hospital, aged 74, after collapsing in prison.

Clifford collapsed in his cell at Littlehey Prison in Cambridgeshire on Thursday and again on Friday, his daughter said. He was taken to hospital where he suffered a cardiac arrest.

He had been serving an eight-year sentence for historical sex offences.

The Ministry of Justice said as with all deaths in custody, there would an investigation by the ombudsman.

A spokeswoman added: “Our condolences are with Mr Clifford’s family at this difficult time.”

His daughter Louise, 46, had told the Mail on Sunday that Clifford first collapsed in his cell on Thursday when he was trying to clean it, adding: “It was just too much.”

She said he collapsed again the next day and was unconscious for several minutes, and after seeing a nurse was transferred to a local hospital where he suffered a cardiac arrest on Friday.

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PA

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During his trial he accused his victims of being fantasists

The Ministry of Justice confirmed Clifford died in hospital on 10 December.

In May 2014, Clifford was jailed after being convicted of eight historical indecent assaults on women and young girls under Operation Yewtree – the Met Police investigation set up in the wake of the Jimmy Savile scandal.

During this trial, evidence was heard about Clifford’s manipulative behaviour, including how he promised to boost the careers of aspiring models and actresses in return for sexual favours.

After his convictions, he continued to protest his innocence.

The Court of Appeal was due to hear his case appealing against his sentence in the New Year.

Clifford’s lawyer, John Szepietowski, said his death meant there were a number of unresolved legal issues.

He said Clifford had been suing News International and Mirror Group Newspapers for allegedly hacking his phone.

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His daughter Louise supported him through his trial

The lawyer also said Clifford was being sued by a number of women who claimed he had sexually assaulted them.

Mr Szepietowski said his legal team would meet in the coming days to decide whether Clifford’s criminal appeal case should continue.

He said Clifford had been receiving legal aid for the appeal, after being declared bankrupt earlier this year and having to sell his Surrey home to pay his debts.

During his long career as a publicist, Clifford, who started his own company at 27, looked after press and publicity for a mixed range of clients such as Marlon Brando, Marvin Gaye, Muhammad Ali and Jade Goody.

He had helped to launch the career of The Beatles by sending press releases about their debut single, Love Me Do, when record company bosses were unsure about the group’s potential.

High-profile clients came to him because of his connections in the tabloid press – while journalists turned to Clifford to provide stories.

However, after 50 years in the showbiz industry allegations against him began to emerge.

In a Facebook post following the announcement that Clifford had died, former X Factor winner Steve Brookstein, claimed he had “orchestrated a media hate campaign” against him.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42300593

Young ska fans in Coventry in 1980Image copyright
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Young ska fans in Coventry in 1980

What was it like growing up in Coventry, and how can being UK City of Culture in 2021 help it continue to regain its confidence?

Going to school in Coventry in the 1970s, there was what probably nobody yet called a shared narrative about the big, busy city we all lived in.

The storyline was a bit depressing, but it was pretty undeniable.

Coventry had attracted tens of thousands of newcomers, such as my parents, in the 1950s.

In the 1960s jobs were plentiful and wages high – it felt like a city going places and there was an air of renewal after the destruction brought by World War Two.

Coventry was never exactly overloaded with high culture – but by the end of the 1950s the Belgrade Theatre was an important venue and from 1965 the University of Warwick boomed on the city’s leafy southern fringes.

(Visitors are often surprised at how attractive the surrounding countryside is.)

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Raids on Coventry during World War Two sent the people of the city into a state of shock

Basil Spence’s modern designs for the new cathedral, consecrated in 1962, had been praised around the world.

The Locarno Ballroom in the shopping precinct may not have been quite as classy but it saw a little bit of pop history – it’s where in February 1972 Chuck Berry recorded My Ding-a-Ling live in front of an appreciative Coventry crowd. (The building later became the Central Library.)

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The cathedral recently received an £870,000 grant for repairs

But things were starting to go wrong.

By the mid-1970s, a universal belief set in that the golden years had gone.

Decline in the manufacturing industry combined with IRA terrorism – and the city’s reputation as a centre of vibrant and optimistic working-class culture was lost.

Later, 2 Tone Records helped launch a nationwide Ska revival.

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Still singing: The Specials performed at the the 2012 Olympics’ Closing Ceremony gig at Hyde Park

But it seemed fitting that The Specials’ big hit was Ghost Town, about urban decay.

Most of the city centre cinemas closed, along with the 2,000-seat Coventry Theatre.

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Coventry City of Culture Trust

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Godiva Awakes, in the Coventry Cathedral ruins, was part of the 2012 Cultural Olympiad

By the late 1980s, many Coventrians looked on their city with something approaching despair.

The city centre was taking on a look of permanent, grimy decline.

For 25 years, Coventry seemed incapable of playing the role nationally that a city of a third of a million people people should.

But very slowly it regained its confidence.

So its selection as UK City of Culture 2021 – which surprised some – comes at a perfect time to put some wind beneath the city’s wings.

Some of the benefits may be institutional.

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Shearer Property Group

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Earlier this year plans were revealed for a £17m redevelopment of Coventry’s city centre

Why doesn’t the Belgrade enjoy funding to give it the standing of successful regional theatres in Sheffield and Northampton?

Why only two years ago was there serious discussion of closing the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum, potentially a leading regional venue?

But there may be another reason why Coventry was the right choice.

After the bombing of World War Two, Coventry became a focus for building afresh in ways beyond the merely physical.

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PA

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The winning city was announced in the current UK City of Culture, Hull

The city, with a superb new cathedral at is heart, was at the forefront of forging a new and open relationship with Europe.

The European Commission has just told the UK it is no longer eligible to provide the European Capital of Culture in 2023.

Perhaps when it came to the UK scheme, Coventry, with its history of renewal and reaching out to Europe, wasn’t a totally surprising choice after all.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-42278355

Rocky Ridge FarmImage copyright
Alamy

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Rocky Ridge Farm is now a museum dedicated to Laura Ingalls Wilder

It’s 150 years since the birth of Little House on the Prairie author Laura Ingalls Wilder – but do her tales about the farming family still appeal to young girls in our technology-driven age?

“Does he have Pa’s fiddle? Does he have Pa’s Fiddle?”

Violinist David Scrivener hears this question every autumn from fans of the books when he walks out of Rocky Ridge Farm on the annual Wilder Day, held in the author’s memory.

Many families have gathered at the Missouri farmhouse where Ingalls Wilder wrote her eight Little House books, to see David play the actual violin which featured in her childhood stories.

Many children wear bonnets and braids like the central character Laura in the books.

Little House on the Prairie – the third in the series – is the most famous book because it gave its name to the wildly unfaithful, but much-loved 70s TV series.

It starred Melissa Gilbert and Dean Butler as the pioneer girl and her future husband growing up in the 1870s and 80s in the Midwest.

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Getty/Alamy

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The Little House on the Prairie TV show starred Melissa Gilbert (left) as Laura Ingalls Wilder

But it’s the beautifully written books, based on Wilder’s real childhood, which have remained international bestsellers since they were first published in the Great Depression.

They have bonded generations of families like Jennifer Dohlman and Elizabeth Tyre – sisters from Oklahoma and Texas – who, as self-declared superfans, have been to 10 of the real locations linked to Wilder’s family.

‘So exciting’

The stories, written with a “once upon a time” fairytale-like tone, describe the now mostly lost wilderness transformed by immigrant farmers.

The family’s hardships were well documented – from seeing wolves howl at the moon to surviving an eight-month winter snowed in and starving, in The Long Winter, the sixth book in the series.

A ninth book, The First Four Years, was published some years after from a draught manuscript several years after the author’s death.

Jennifer and Elizabeth are moved to tears like many visitors hearing David play “Pa’s fiddle”. They’re here with their mother Jonelle Jenson and Jennifer’s two daughters Carmen, who’s seven, and 10-year-old Katelyn.

“This is not just any fiddle. This is THE fiddle,” Elizabeth explains. “Seriously I have goosebumps right now because this is so exciting.”

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Samira Ahmed

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The Dohlman family from Tulsa, Oklahoma are all fans of the Little House books

They argue playfully about who gets to be Laura. “My sister’s older,” says Elizabeth. “She thinks she should get to be Laura. I never got to be Laura.”

In the gift shop where visitors browse shelves of books and jars of local Missouri apple butter, there are often deeply personal emotional connections to Ingalls Wilder’s stories.

One young women says: “When I was in third grade our teacher Mrs Murray told us she wanted to read us some stories. I was just hooked and read them all in the next year.

“What drew me was her spirit, her tenacity. I had a very troubled childhood. My father was an alcoholic and very abusive and something about the hardships that she went through, but kept such a positive spirit, inspired me.”

There are people in pioneer costume doing displays of spinning, sewing and butter-making.

As in the UK, there’s been a renewed interest among young women for “make-it-yourself” crafts that the Little House books celebrate.

‘Incredibly blessed’

Ingalls Wilder was a publishing pioneer too, in suggesting her books be marketed as a Young Adult series, which followed Laura growing up from five to 19 when she married Almanzo.

Readers grew up with her like today’s children do with Harry Potter.

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Samira Ahmed

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Dean Butler played Laura’s husband Almanzo in the TV series (left) and Samira Ahmed met up with him at Rocky Ridge Farm

Actor Dean Butler, who is among the speakers at Wilder Day, played Laura’s sweetheart in the TV series.

The show “was never cool” he says, but is still loved like the books because it celebrated kindness and family values.

“I feel incredibly blessed that I was the beneficiary of so much affection from people who say they loved him because Laura loved him.”

‘Lifelike’

Inside the perfect little handmade house, which the real Laura and Almanzo built together, visitors stop to admire the pioneer spirit that fills the still immaculate kitchen with tiny counters for her 4ft 11in (1.5m) height.

Pa’s fiddle hangs in the parlour when it’s not being played.

It’s like Ingalls Wilder’s books come to life. All that’s missing is the dark haired rebellious girl who tricked mean Nellie into the creek full of leeches and rode a pony bare back.

Historian and Ingalls Wilder biographer William Anderson stands in the parlour watching the crowds and understands.

“A teacher told me Laura seems so lifelike to her fourth graders that the girls would go home and talk about Laura Laura Laura,” he says.

“And the parents would ask, ‘who is this new girl in class?’ Laura is passed on like a family heirloom.”

Silver-haired Jean Cody, now elderly herself, was once a little girl whose family knew Laura and Almanzo well.

She has helped run Rocky Ridge Farm as a museum since 1960, just three years after Ingalls Wilder died. She still holds the author as an inspiration.

“I thought I had a heroine in her because she was her father’s helper and I applaud her for being a modern woman in a not modern time.”

Laura Ingalls’ America is on BBC Radio 3 at 18:45GMT on Sunday 10 December

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-42243149

SalvadorImage copyright
Reuters

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Salvador Sobral missed a week of Eurovision rehearsals due to his heart condition

Portugal’s celebrated Eurovision Song Contest winner, Salvador Sobral, is recovering in hospital after undergoing a heart transplant.

Surgeons at the Santa Cruz Hospital in the Portuguese capital, Lisbon, said the 27-year-old was “doing well”.

Sobral, who suffered from a longstanding heart condition, won this year’s contest with the love song Amar Pelos Dois (Love for Both of Us).

It was the first time Portugal had taken the title.

“The surgery went well,” said surgeon Miguel Abecasis, quoted by the Publico daily (in Portuguese).

“He was very well prepared. He is a young man who understood the difficulties of this type of procedure.”

Mr Abecasis said that before Friday’s operation the singer had wished him “good luck”.

The recovery would take a long time, Mr Abecasis added, but said that if all went well, Sobral would have “a completely normal life”.

The singer had to wait several months until a suitable donor was found, Publico reported. He announced in September that he was taking a break from performing.

Sobral’s winning ballad, written by his older sister, Luisa, made him a national hero in Portugal.

He described it as “an emotional song with a beautiful lyrical message and harmony – things people are not used to listening these days”.

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-42296971

Calvin Harris is under pressure to remix the Spice Girls classic 2 become 1 after he told another DJ he’d do it if same-sex marriage was legalised in Australia.

Now the law has been changed, people think Calvin should stick to his word. Even Baby Spice Emma Bunton’s got involved.

Australian DJ Filip Odzak told Newsbeat: “He shook my hand on the deal. I have been waiting for this pot of gold at the end of this proverbial rainbow for five years!”

He’s text Calvin to remind him.

https://twitter.com/FILIP_WithAnF/status/938722762150985728

The pair met during the Stereosonic festival in Sydney back in 2012.

Filip explains: “Calvin did a show and a crew of us came along and hung out in the backstage bar / green room.

“The conversation turned to the topic of wedding songs, I chimed in and said mine would be Spice Girls 2 become 1 and everyone had a giggle.

“Calvin was shocked when we told him that gay marriage wasn’t a reality in Australia yet.

“I vividly remember his face, he was in genuine shock.

“I said to him when they finally legalise it you can remix 2 become 1 to celebrate.

“He 100% would have thought it was a laugh, and lets be honest, it’s a one in a million conversation, but he shook my hand on the deal.”

Calvin Harris DJ

MP’s in Australia have voted to legalise same-sex marriage.

People celebrate as same sex marriage has been legalised in Australia

Filip wants the song remixed so he can play it at his wedding some day.

“It’s a total gay bridal waltz anthem,” he tells us.

Even Baby Spice is on board with the idea.

Emma Bunton told Newsbeat: “Let’s spice up Calvin Harris! It would be fab for Calvin to remix 2 become 1.

“It’s always been my favourite Spice Girls song and next week it will be 21 years since it was released as a single.

“I’m so happy to be celebrating same sex marriage equality in Australia, as a Spice Girl it’s something I’ve been wishing for forever! Love always wins.”

Emma Bunton
https://twitter.com/xsuzie_G/status/938848064806227968

https://twitter.com/jordanletkemann/status/938970492425441280
Spice Girls performing on stage

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articles/42280454

Dustin Hoffman, Oct 2017Image copyright
Reuters

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Hoffman has not commented on the latest allegations

A co-star of Hollywood actor Dustin Hoffman has accused him of a “horrific, demoralising and abusive experience” while on a 1984 Broadway production.

Kathryn Rossetter’s allegation comes a month after author Anna Graham Hunter accused Hoffman of sexual misconduct.

Hoffman has not commented on the latest claims in the Hollywood Reporter.

It said it had spoken to several people on the 1984 set who questioned Rossetter’s account and said they had not witnessed the conduct described.

The latest allegation is one of a string made against Hollywood stars and executives, sparked by initial allegations against producer Harvey Weinstein.

‘I went home and cried’

Rossetter’s account was carried in a guest column in the Hollywood Reporter on Friday, as Anna Graham Hunter’s allegations had been in an article on 1 November.

Rossetter said the alleged events had occurred on the 1984 Broadway production of Death Of A Salesman.

She said Hoffman would regularly grope her. The actor would grab her breast and then remove his hand just before a photograph was taken, she alleged.

On one night, she said, Hoffman exposed her body to the stage crew. “Suddenly he grabs the bottom of my slip and pulls it up over my head, exposing my breasts and body to the crew and covering my face,” she said.

Rossetter added: “Night after night I went home and cried. I withdrew and got depressed and did not have any good interpersonal relationships with the cast.”

She said: “I considered reporting him to Actors Equity. But I was cautioned by some respected theatre professionals that if I did, I would probably lose my job and, because he was such a powerful star, any hope of a career.”

The Reporter said Hoffman’s lawyers had put it in touch with others who had worked on the set, including Hoffman’s brother-in-law, Lee Gottsegen, and actors Anne McIntosh, Debra Mooney, Linda Hogan, Michael Quinlan and Andrew Bloch.

The paper said they had not witnessed the alleged misconduct and had questioned Rossetter’s account.

Production stage manager Tom Kelly said: “It just doesn’t ring true.”

Earlier in the week, TV host John Oliver confronted Dustin Hoffman, 80, in a tense public discussion about the allegations of sexual harassment made by Graham Hunter.

At a QA panel for the 20th anniversary of Hoffman’s film Wag The Dog, the actor defended himself, asking Oliver: “Do you believe this stuff that you’re reading?” and saying he still did not know who Graham Hunter was.

She worked as a 17-year-old intern on Hoffman’s 1985 TV movie version of Death Of A Salesman.

Hoffman had earlier put out a statement following Graham Hunter’s allegations, saying: “I have the utmost respect for women and feel terrible that anything I might have done could have put her in an uncomfortable situation.

“I am sorry. It is not reflective of who I am.”

Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-42291775

Liam Payne, Demi Lovato and Camila Cabello will all present Christmas Day shows on Radio 1.

The station has announced the pop stars will host Radio 1′s Superstar Playlist programmes.

They will be taking over the station for an hour at a time, playing their favourite songs with some classic Christmas tunes thrown in as well (obviously).

It’ll be on air between 10am and 4pm.

Demi Lovato in the Radio 1 studios

Jason Derulo and The Vamps will also be getting listeners into the festive spirit with an hour show each.

Joining the musicians are some of the worlds best known actors.

Between midday and 1pm, Radio 1′s film critic Ali Plumb will call upon some of Hollywood’s finest to get involved.

Kirsten Dunst, Chris Hemsworth and Chloë Grace Moretz are just some of the names who’ll be choosing their favourite songs too.

Liam Payne says: “Looking forward to playing some of my favourite music on Radio 1 this Christmas!”

The Vamps in the Radio 1 studios

The Vamps say: “We can’t quite believe Radio 1 have asked us back to host our own on Christmas Day show for a third year but we love it.

“It’s the best day of the year so bring on the festivities and let’s have a party!”

“I’m so excited to be part of Radio 1′s Christmas Day takeover,” says Demi Lovato.

“I can’t wait to play you some of my favourite songs and sound-track the festive season!”

Jason Derulo in the Radio 1 studios

Something tells us Camila Cabello is looking forward to it as well.

She says: “It’s Christmassssssssss!!

“I am so excited to be on Radio 1 on Christmas Day playing some of my favourite music!”

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articles/42293626

StormzyImage copyright
Getty Images

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Stormzy made the transition from underground success to household name in 2017

Stormzy has been named artist of the year at the 2017 BBC Music Awards, capping a hugely successful year.

The south London MC, whose debut album Gang Signs Prayer was the first grime record to reach number one, beat Ed Sheeran and Lorde to the prize.

He adds it to a collection that already includes three Mobos and the Q Award for best solo artist.

Rag N Bone Man collected album of the year, while Foo Fighters won best live performance for their Glastonbury set.

Media captionHighlights of Foo Fighters’ set at Glastonbury 2017

The US band headlined the festival this June, two years after they were forced to pull out when frontman Dave Grohl broke his leg.

Taking to the stage this summer, Grohl blamed the delay on “bad traffic”, before launching into a blistering, hit-filled set.

Their performance eventually overran by 20 minutes because the crowd kept singing between songs.

  • Foo Fighters finally headline Glastonbury
  • Stormzy: Seven things you need to know
  • Rag N Bone Man interview (BBC Sound of 2017)
  • Declan McKenna wins BBC Introducing prize

“It really did just turn into this one big ball of love and energy and celebration and music,” Grohl said as he collected the BBC Music Award.

“That’s what you want every show to be, but when it’s on that scale it’s a big feeling.”

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This year’s BBC Music Award winners pose with their trophies

Rag N Bone Man’s prize came in recognition of his debut album Human, which is the year’s biggest-selling debut.

“That’s a proper good award,” he said. “I keep thinking at one point that someone is going to fishhook me off and tell me it’s a joke, but it’s not, and it’s a wonderful thing to have.”

In previous years, the BBC Music Awards have been handed out at a glitzy televised arena concert, with performances from the likes of One Direction, Little Mix and Robbie Williams.

However, after disappointing ratings (2016′s show was watched by 2.7 million people) this year’s awards were handed out during a a one-hour BBC Two special titled The Year In Music 2017.

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Youtube post by BBC Music: Rag N Bone Man - Human - Later with Jools Holland - BBC TwoImage Copyright BBC Music
BBC Music

Hosted by Claudia Winkleman and Clara Amfo, it looked at some of the year’s biggest music stories, from the One Love concert in Manchester to Black Sabbath’s last ever gig.

Stormzy, who self-released his debut album in February, has been one of the year’s biggest breakout stars.

The rapper also contributed a heartbreaking verse to the Artists for Grenfell single, and collaborated with the likes of Ed Sheeran, Krept Konan and Little Mix.

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Youtube post by BBC Radio 1: Stormzy - Big For Your Boots in the Live LoungeImage Copyright BBC Radio 1
BBC Radio 1

“When I done the song with Little Mix, some people thought that questioned my integrity,” he told the BBC Two show. “I was like, ‘bro, I rate Little Mix more than I rate some of your favourite rappers.’”

On receiving his artist of the year prize, the star, whose real name is Michael Omari, said: “I’m actually blessed to be able to say that I’m an artist that’s managed to be regarded as someone that’s worthy of this award.

“I don’t know what the future holds for me but I’m definitely ready for it.”

Media captionDeclan McKenna talks to BBC Breakfast about his award

One final award, for BBC Introducing artist of the year, went to rising star Declan McKenna, whose effervescent indie-pop songs address weighty topics like police brutality, transgender conversion therapy and corruption at Fifa.

The star, who first got played on radio after uploading songs to the BBC Introducing website as a 15-year-old, thanked the organisation “for relentlessly rooting for me throughout the years”.

  • Meanwhile, the BBC has confirmed that its new music programme Sounds Like Friday Night has been commissioned for a second series.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-42282182

StormzyImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Stormzy made the transition from underground success to household name in 2017

Stormzy has been named artist of the year at the 2017 BBC Music Awards, capping a hugely successful year.

The south London MC, whose debut album Gang Signs Prayer was the first grime record to reach number one, beat Ed Sheeran and Lorde to the prize.

He adds it to a collection that already includes three Mobos and the Q Award for best solo artist.

Rag N Bone Man collected album of the year, while Foo Fighters won best live performance for their Glastonbury set.

Media captionHighlights of Foo Fighters’ set at Glastonbury 2017

The US band headlined the festival this June, two years after they were forced to pull out when frontman Dave Grohl broke his leg.

Taking to the stage this summer, Grohl blamed the delay on “bad traffic”, before launching into a blistering, hit-filled set.

Their performance eventually overran by 20 minutes because the crowd kept singing between songs.

  • Foo Fighters finally headline Glastonbury
  • Stormzy: Seven things you need to know
  • Rag N Bone Man interview (BBC Sound of 2017)
  • Declan McKenna wins BBC Introducing prize

“It really did just turn into this one big ball of love and energy and celebration and music,” Grohl said as he collected the BBC Music Award.

“That’s what you want every show to be, but when it’s on that scale it’s a big feeling.”

Image caption

This year’s BBC Music Award winners pose with their trophies

Rag N Bone Man’s prize came in recognition of his debut album Human, which is the year’s biggest-selling debut.

“That’s a proper good award,” he said. “I keep thinking at one point that someone is going to fishhook me off and tell me it’s a joke, but it’s not, and it’s a wonderful thing to have.”

In previous years, the BBC Music Awards have been handed out at a glitzy televised arena concert, with performances from the likes of One Direction, Little Mix and Robbie Williams.

However, after disappointing ratings (2016′s show was watched by 2.7 million people) this year’s awards were handed out during a a one-hour BBC Two special titled The Year In Music 2017.

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Hosted by Claudia Winkleman and Clara Amfo, it looked at some of the year’s biggest music stories, from the One Love concert in Manchester to Black Sabbath’s last ever gig.

Stormzy, who self-released his debut album in February, has been one of the year’s biggest breakout stars.

The rapper also contributed a heartbreaking verse to the Artists for Grenfell single, and collaborated with the likes of Ed Sheeran, Krept Konan and Little Mix.

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“When I done the song with Little Mix, some people thought that questioned my integrity,” he told the BBC Two show. “I was like, ‘bro, I rate Little Mix more than I rate some of your favourite rappers.’”

On receiving his artist of the year prize, the star, whose real name is Michael Omari, said: “I’m actually blessed to be able to say that I’m an artist that’s managed to be regarded as someone that’s worthy of this award.

“I don’t know what the future holds for me but I’m definitely ready for it.”

Media captionDeclan McKenna talks to BBC Breakfast about his award

One final award, for BBC Introducing artist of the year, went to rising star Declan McKenna, whose effervescent indie-pop songs address weighty topics like police brutality, transgender conversion therapy and corruption at Fifa.

The star, who first got played on radio after uploading songs to the BBC Introducing website as a 15-year-old, thanked the organisation “for relentlessly rooting for me throughout the years”.

  • Meanwhile, the BBC has confirmed that its new music programme Sounds Like Friday Night has been commissioned for a second series.

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Article source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-42282182